One Life Every Minute

Cardiac deaths among men have declined over the last 25 years, but disease rates in women have not experienced the same downward trend. Learn to recognize the warning signs and how you can be proactive in staying heart-healthy.

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Sources:

“Gender and Heart Disease.” Go Red for Women, https://www.goredforwomen.org/know-your-risk/find-out-your-risk/gender-heart-disease. Accessed 1 Feb. 2017.

“Gender Matters: Heart Disease Risk in Women.” Harvard Health Publications: Harvard Medical School, 2008, http://www.health.harvard.edu/heart-health/gender-matters-heart-disease-risk-in-women. Accessed 1 Feb. 2017.

Barouch, Lili. “Heart Disease: Differences in Men and Women.” Johns Hopkins Medicine, http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/heart_vascular_institute/clinical_services/centers_excellence/womens_cardiovascular_health_center/patient_information/health_topics/heart_disease_gender_differences.html. Accessed 1 Feb. 2017.

“Heart disease in women: Understand Symptoms and Risk Factors.” Mayo Clinic, http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/heart-disease/in-depth/heart-disease/art-20046167. Accessed 1 Feb. 2017.

“Women’s Health.” World Health Organization. 2013, http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs334/en. Accessed 1 Feb. 2017.

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